jill sylvia: intricately cut ledger paper structures

using ledger paper as her medium, the american artist re-creates significant U.S. buildings as a means of exploring society’s serial structure, financial architecture, capital as an ungrounded sign and value in general.

read more

A Google Reader Starred Item

The Italian God of Concrete’s Palazzetto dello Sport

0pierluiginervi1.jpg

[photo by Nick Tyrer]

I was poring over TyrerTecture, architecture student Nick Tyrer’s blog primarily detailing his fascinating digital fabrication experiments, when the photo above caught my eye mid-scroll. This one’s not one of his projects; it’s a photo he shot in Rome of the Palazzetto dello Sport, otherwise known as the basketball stadium for the 1960 Olympics, designed by Pier Luigi Nervi. (The structure still stands and has been used to hold a variety of athletic events.)

0pierluiginervi2.jpg

Nervi was what’s known in Italy as an ingegnere edile, which literally translates as “building engineer” and in practice is something like a cross between a structural engineer and an architect. He’s also been called “The Great Italian God of Concrete.” A student of ancient architecture as well as an early proponent of reinforced concrete, Nervi proved to be a designer who could masterfully blend techniques from the past and future to create a compelling present.

For the Palazzetto dello Sport, Nervi drew upon the geometry-based domes of ancient Roman architecture and combined it with reinforced concrete and radical-for-the-era prefabrication techniques. His design for a ribbed concrete dome, more than 60 meters in diameter and supported on the exterior of the building by Y-shaped concrete buttresses, was cast in prefabricated sections and snapped together in just 40 days.

0pierluiginervi3.jpg

Now that we live in an era of 30-story buildings going up in 15 days, 40 days may not sound like a short period of time; but consider that Nervi masterminded this thing using technology from 1957, the year the Palazzetto went up. If time-traveling ancient Romans could see the building and hear Nervi’s nickname, they might ask who the Italians were, but they’d probably agree on the “god” part.

0pierluiginervi4.jpg

(more…)

A Google Reader Starred Item

AELLON’s Grace: Sustainable Furniture from Uhuru and a 61-Foot Fishing Boat

aellon-digbybeamtable.pngDigby Beam Table, from structural beams that framed the Grace’s hull.

With dumpster divers, salvage supply warehouses and innumerable upcycled interiors dotting the landscape, Brooklyn might be home to some of the thriftiest and innovative recyclers. Brooklyn-based designers Uhuru are no strangers to using reclaimed material. The design duo of Jason Horvath and Bill Hilgendorf were name-checked in a recent NYTimes article about their 2010 Coney Island line made from reclaimed boardwalk Ipe wood and we wrote in-depth about their 2011 War Craft collection made from planks salvaged from the USS North Carolina’s deck.

aellon-liefstool.pngHand-carved from leftover pieces of boatwood from the shop. You might recognize the style of the Lief Puzzle Stool from Uhuru’s previous work for the New Museum lobby or from their 2008 ICFF collection.

While visiting Indonesia, Horvath came across a 61-foot fishing boat that had washed up in a monsoon. The 45-year-old boat, aptly named Grace, was constructed with now-threatened rainforest woods and was being disassembled to be sold off, piece-by-piece, for firewood. The designer made an offer to the boat’s owner and now Grace has come to the shores of Brooklyn to find a new life as beautifully hand-crafted furniture.

aellon-grace.jpeg

(more…)

A Google Reader Starred Item

interactive high speed flip-dot display by breakfast


the super-speed electromagnet dot display creates an interactive anagram-finding experience on the streets of new york. building off technology from information flip-boards found throughout older airports and train-stations, the project components are re-engineered from the ground up, enabling them to operate in real-time.
read more

A Google Reader Starred Item

Made in the USA: KA-BAR Knives, a Bona Fide Slice of Americana

KABAR-1.jpgKABAR-COMP1.jpg

Film production company Common Machine doesn’t mince its words when it comes to their latest project, for KA-BAR knives: “The company may be more than a century old, but its emerging marketing philosophy is (if you’ll forgive the pun) cutting edge: No more old media, just badass branded entertainment for the Web.”

KABAR-2.jpgKABAR-COMP2.jpg

Which shouldn’t detract from your viewing experience in the least: the sub-2.5-minute short hits that double sweet spot of American manufacturing heritage and superior production value.

If that doesn’t make you want a KA-BAR knife, I regret to inform you that you’re not a blue-blooded American… perhaps you’d be more interested to see the Australian and European alternatives (for manufacturing videos, not knives… Crocodile Dundee has nothing on us).

KABAR-3.jpg

via aarn_

(more…)

A Google Reader Starred Item

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry is a San Francisco based jewelry studio that uses digital fabrication to create their line of statement pieces. With architecture and interior design in their education backgrounds, the duo had the experience with 3D printing and other types of technologies that they brought to the development of their collection.

Fathom & Form Jewelry

The pieces have a definite architectural feel with geometric shapes and forms full of dimension. With complex forms and clean lines, this collection definitely ranks at the top of my most favorites.

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry

This ring needs to be on my finger pronto.

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry

Fathom & Form Jewelry


Share This: Twitter | Facebook | Discover more great design by following Design Milk on Twitter and Facebook.


© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Caroline in Style + Fashion | Permalink | 1 comment

A Google Reader Starred Item

When the Packaging is Part of the Product

tubetoys1.jpg

There’s an old adage for anyone who has kids (and/or cats). You spend all the money on a new toy or technology, but what does the gift recipient end up playing with most? The box.

But never fear. Tube Toys, designed by London designer Oscar Diaz for NPW, makes the packaging a part of the toy. From a car to a tractor to a fire truck, the toys are simple vehicles with all the parts inside for assembly, including the wheels, axles and stickers for labels. The tube part comes in when you start putting the toy together by using the tube for the vehicle’s body.

tubetoys2.jpg

The only wasted parts? The label wrapping, which doubles as instructions, and the sticker paper, after the stickers are removed. That’s part of the value statement of Tube Toys, which emphasizes the green part of its toys, noting that the packages reduces “considerably the amount of material discarded after purchase, and the added cost that traditional packaging involves.” What’s more, Diaz notes that the materials themselves are made of “recycled and/or recyclable” materials.

tubetoys3.jpg

As a designed object, Tube Toys represent a creative way to incorporate the packaging. I got a chance to play with the train and it was easy enough to assemble the pieces and then disassemble them at the end of the toys. The tubes could easily be stacked end to end in a special box, making storage at the end of the day a cinch as well. It will be interesting to see if Diaz can expand his concept further, with other toys that incorporate the packaging.

(more…)

A Google Reader Starred Item

Limited Edition Goods vs. Mass Manufacturing

0deusxmakr1.jpg

We’ve touched on this topic only briefly before, so I’d like to hear impressions on the topic of limited-edition goods—impressions specifically from the industrial design community, as ID’s raison d’etre, of course, is mass production. We all have our different views and opinions of things, but I’m starting to worry than mine is veering so far outside of what’s currently normal that I’m in danger of no longer being able to comprehend the normal consumer’s thinking.

Here’s what sparked this. These are shots of the Deux X Makr Tool Roll, a collaboration between Australian handbuilt motorcycle outfit Deus Ex Machina and Florida-based bag manufacturer Makr Carry Goods.

0deusxmakr2.jpg

As you’ll see in the quick vid below, the bag looks beautiful and appears nicely functional:

It was intended for a small production run, but “unprecented demand” meant the bags sold out extremely quickly. This prompted Deus and Maker to order up another production run, which seems logical. But what struck me was this comment left on their page by a purchaser of a first-run bag:

Glad I brought one before they sold out! I hope thought [sic] that there is a point of difference between these and your next re-run. I brought one because there was potentially only 50 available—that justified the price I paid for it. Please don’t dilute the value of these awesome rolls by producing more than was promised (in this design anyway).

I understand the part of society where we pay more for things that are scarce, a model based on the allocation of natural resources. I get that we make houses out of wood and engagement rings out of gold and diamonds. What I’m not keen on is the notion of contrived scarcity, where seemingly every manufacturer with a stylish product artificially limits the production run purely to justify a higher price tag. I understand this practice’s value in fashion, where two society women at a party don’t want to show up in the same dress; but I’m having a problem mapping this notion onto machine tools.

(more…)

A Google Reader Starred Item