Alien Skull Trophy

 Alien Skull Trophy
Replica of the alien skull that appeared last only for a moment the scene of Predator 2 by Psycho Monsterz.

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Giveaway from DYT and Yumaki! Win Yumaki’s amazing A101 toothbrush! Design You Trust and the new Swedish/Japanese oral care brand Yumaki are teaming up to give away four styles of Yumaki’s A101 toothbrushes to 12 randomly selected Design You Trust readers!

Via Design You Trust – Design Blog and Community http://designyoutrust.com/2012/08/alien-skull-trophy/?utm_so…

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A New American Picture

Photographer Doug Rickard travels the backroads of America on Google Street View

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If photographer Doug Rickard had been able to get away from his daily life and go on the great American road trip like he wanted to, he might never have created the subtly powerful, deeply moving and award-winning images in the collection “A New American Picture.” Because he was unable to travel, Rickard sought other ways to see the country. He went online a lot, searching terms that might lead to images of places like Detroit, which to him symbolized “the mythology of the broken down American dream.” A few months after it was created, Rickard discovered Google Street View and, along with it, a higher calling.

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He was floored by the fact that he could sit at home and “walk” the streets of any town, anywhere in the country. Rickard spent the next two years scouring Google Street View for images of the unseen America, starting in Detroit, though he soon discovered that there were countless other “Detroits” all over across America. He was stunned by towns like the 400-person town of Amite City, Louisiana, which has changed little since Ben Shahn photographed it more than 70 years ago.

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Moving through the streets shot by Google’s Street View cameras, Rickard searched for vivid colors and compositions that have led critics to liken his work to Stephen Shore and William Eggleston. He also kept the idea of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s “decisive moment” in the front of his mind, and recalls the sense of elation when he dropped into Watts in LA one day and discovered a man holding a hose against a stark white wall. Though there have been some grumblings about ownership and intellectual property, those have mostly been quashed by the power of Rickard’s work and his abilities to use—one might even say repurpose—a widespread technology to show us a new way of looking at what’s in front of our very eyes, which is what good photographers strive to do.

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A limited edition of “A New American Picture” was published by White Press and Schaden in 2010, and even though it was named best book of 2010 by Photo-Eye Magazine and images were exhibited in the MoMA, it went out of print. Now, however, Aperture is re-releasing the book to a wider audience along with 40 new images.

“A New American Picture” is co-published by Koenig Books, and is available for pre-order on Amazon for $60. An accompanying exhibition will be on view 18 October through 24 November 2012 at Yossi Milo Gallery in New York.

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Deconstruction: Werken Design

Deconstruction: Werken Design

In this month’s Deconstruction, Ian Riedel of Sonoma-based metal fabrication studio, Werken Design, leads us through the process of creating a rusted steel and reclaimed wood table. We get to see how the design evolves, through whim and necessity, hearing his musings along the way. We learned about his studio through CustomMade, an online marketplace that connects customers with the skilled makers.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

The first sketch is inspired by the image of an inverted fighter jet’s tail section. My initial intention is to use simple rectangular plates as legs. Cost of fabrication is kept low (it’s the economy) and simple: legs are two rectangles of 3/8” steel plate with a rusted finish, topped with a large knotted slab of readily available wood.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

The basic layout is transferred to CAD at this point, where lines are pushed, dragged, deleted, and redrawn, resulting in the above profile. I trim the wood to a slim top (big wood is costly) and determine that some form of cross bracing is needed for support.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

Rather than using just the shape of the fighter jet’s tail, I decide to employ the requirements of airplane design and attempt to trim the 3/8” steel plate to the bare minimum required for support. Flipping through a Hector Guimard book, I use curved lines, and decide to cut away at the original rectangular legs. (Screw the economy.)

Deconstruction: Werken Design

Magic of modern manufacture! This is the most amazing part for me. Having finished all the drawings in detail, I send the CAD file to a production LASER cutter. In the most awesome of Buck-Rogers-Han-Solo-Star-Wars way, my drawings are rendered in steel in minutes, and with an accuracy of a few thousandths of an inch. Seriously . . . a little beam of really bright light cuts this stuff. Freaking awesome! Not quite the personal jet-pack I’ve always dreamed of, but close.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

De-burring of laser cut parts is quick work. The micro-rippled edge of the cut surface is left intact to add interest to the surface. What I originally envisioned—the rusted-rectangular-legged-Japanese-styled-heavy-slab bench—has turned into a far different beast.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

All preliminary finish work complete, I prepare to bend the tabs at the top and bottom of each leg into shape. CRAP! Too much dragging and deleting in CAD has led to a manufacturing headache. The problem: initially I drew the top edge of the leg to accommodate tooling for the bending process, but later, I went back to the drawing board to work on the look without considering manufacturing restraints. The result: a trimmed but unbendable leg at the point it attaches to the wood top. What to do? This is a problem best solved in repose with beer in hand. Eventually I decide to cut away one section of each leg so that the press-brake can bend it. Later I weld in a replacement to the cut-out sections. I make notes on the drawings that I must redraw this detail.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

The original design that called for diagonal bracing or tensioned cable has given way to an arched dog-bone brace. I bend it on a simple wood form.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

The legs are clamped together ready for welding. The arch is dropped into place to make sure it lines up with the legs. Now I’m ready to weld. I’m often called a welder, but as is often the case I spend less than two minutes actually welding this piece.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

I test-assemble the legs with all hardware in place. Everything fits well, so I disassemble, chemically strip the black mill-scale (a kind of high-temperature “rust” left over from original manufacture of the steel plate itself), and apply a chemical blackening for the patina, followed by a sealer.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

I cut and test fit the bench top. It’s reclaimed Douglas fir lumber that is more than 100 years old. Its dimensions are 2”x12”. I found this wood in a stack of old floor joists from a torn-down warehouse on the Petaluma riverfront. Of all the well-worn wood, this piece had the most knots and nail scars.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

Usually I contract wood portions of jobs to one of several wood shops I work with. This particular project I will undertake myself. Not being a trained woodworker has its benefits. I’m not shrouded in the rules of the trade. There’s a bench in Yosemite park polished by the asses of time into the most magnificent natural shine, with the most beautiful revealing texture of wood grain. This is my guide. Of course, not being a trained woodworker has its drawbacks too. I’m attempting to recreate a finish that has taken decades and tens of thousands of unknowing participants to achieve. Slap something on, sand it off, repeat.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

Here’s the finished bench compared to its original sketch. Evolution happens.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

I’m happy with the results. The heavy steel plate leg is trimmed at the center to its bare minimum of 2 inches, implying lightness. Felt glides make the feet safe for the most delicate of floors, and also float the bench 1/4” off the ground, revealing light between metal and floor.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

The patina is a dull patchy scratchy grey-to-black that I’ve mostly burnished off to allow the natural silver color of steel to show through. The hardware is a slightly darker tone so it visually pops from the legs.

Deconstruction: Werken Design

The completed project! I’ve decided that for future versions, the two legs will be cut as one panel in order to simplify the manufacturing process (fewer parts, less assembly time, and two welds not 10). I’m already picturing variations: rusted steel; finely-finished stainless; recessed hardware for a more modern take; a crisply finished wood top. I’m currently exploring the cost and viability of doing the top in glass. I am also going to revisit the original sketch as all steel construction to see where that leads.


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Marni in Home Furnishings | Permalink | No comments

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Notitarde: Witnesses, Tsunami

Notitarde: Witnesses, Tsunami

Notitarde Daily News
More than 82.000 witnesses everyday.

Notitarde is a local newspaper that takes pride in it’s certified daily publishing which tops the 82.000 newspapers each day, everyday.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett, Caracas, Venezuela
Creative Directors: Ali Armas, Virgilio Flores
Art Directors: René Bustamante, Mariana Ortega
Copywriters: Manuel Fleitas, Andrea Gil
Illustrators: Eduardo Gomes, Ali Armas
Photographer: Rodolfo Benitez
Published: May 2012

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Visionaire 62 Rio

The shape-shifting arts and fashion publication goes stereoscopic

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Continually pushing the boundaries of traditional publishing, quarterly art and fashion magazine Visionaire has released their 62nd issue in conjunction with NYC-based design firm Aruliden and Brazilian retail developer and contemporary art patron Iguatemi. As with each issue, the theme and format has once again changed. This time Visionaire takes the form of a stereoscope. Designed, developed and manufactured by Aruliden, the “issue” contains 18 slides depicting photographic works by a wide range of renowned artists to express the life, culture and arts of Brazil without any of the flamenco dancing clichés. Artists featured include Maurizio Cattelan, Marco Brambilla, Alas & Marcus Piggott and even Karl Lagerfeld.

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Each slide features two images, shot from two cameras at a measured distance from both each other and the subject. The stereoscope’s two lenses are spaced from each other and the viewing plane at the same proportion putting the slide at the correct distance ratio from your line of sight to best capture the stereoscope’s ability create the illusion of three dimensions. The impressively sharp images are seen as if at the end of a long dark hallway. Much like one would encounter art in a gallery—surrounded by white walls with a single object of attention—the user gets a uniquely isolated viewing experience from the black box stereoscope.

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Described by Aruliden founder and lead designer Johan Liden as a “non object,” the stereoscope’s beautifully designed block-like body seems both intuitive and ambiguous at the same time. On one end the soft nose and eye cutouts seem to encourage the user to hold it to their face, while the sharp edges and matte finish of the other sides offer few clues as to the product’s purpose. “Architecturally it’s very linear and square,” says Liden, explaining that the injection-molded plastic is produced with a slightly silky, soft touch finish to soften the device without changing its shape and make it more “friendly.”

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While the low-tech stereoscope may seem basic in form, it was no easy feat to create. Liden and his team worked on the design for an entire year, toying with options from shapes inspired by an open book to an ode to the classic ViewMaster 3D toy. After extensive prototyping and testing ideas, the design team settled on the final, elegant shape.

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Available in a choice of two lenticular-paneled boxes, the limited-run Visionaire issue 62 Rio can now be bought directly from Visionaire. Limited to just 2,000 total editions, issue 62 sells for $375. For a closer look at the packaging and product design see the slideshow.

Images by Graham Hiemstra and Aruliden

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