You Won’t Want To Throw Stones From This House of Glass

You Wont Want To Throw Stones From This House of Glass

Could you imagine living in a real glass house? Created as a concept to showcase Italian company Santambrogio’s glass furniture line, this set of two concept homes would be made from blue-ish glass. From the mind of architect Carlo Santambrogio and designer Enno Arosic, you could actually own one of these if you so desired… if you could stomach the $6200-per-square-foot pricetag and the monthly cleaning bill.

You Wont Want To Throw Stones From This House of Glass

You Wont Want To Throw Stones From This House of Glass

You Wont Want To Throw Stones From This House of Glass

You Wont Want To Throw Stones From This House of Glass

You Wont Want To Throw Stones From This House of Glass

[hat tip: Apartment Therapy]


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Jaime Derringer in Architecture | Permalink | 5 comments

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Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

The London-based design studio Logical Art, has come out with a new concept in wearable art. Air Tattoo is a line of hand-drawn patterns that they turned into paper jewelry, resembling an “air-like tattoo.” Each of the four styles looks like a delicate line drawing that has been cut out and made to hang around the neck. They make a beautiful statement on the body, kind of like a real tattoo (except you can remove these much more easily).

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

The Air Tattoo’s are made from an eco-friendly, water- and tear-resistant paper that is almost leather-like. The collection is relatively inexpensive and you can still get in on their Kickstarter campaign which has already been fully funded.

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art

Air Tattoo Jewelry Made from Paper by Logical Art


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Caroline in Style + Fashion | Permalink | 2 comments

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Fort Standard Jewelry

The Brooklyn-based makers add accessories to the mix

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Having built a repertoire of supremely simple, thoughtfully crafted contemporary furniture, lighting and home objects, Brooklyn-based design pair Gregory Buntain and Ian Collings of Fort Standard take their ethos in a new direction with a line of jewelry. “Jewelry allows us to explore the more sculptural side of design while simultaneously forcing us out of our comfort zone, which usually creates interesting results,” says Buntain.

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The collection, which debuted this weekend in the American Design Club booth at this year’s Gift Fair in New York, comprises six brass bracelets and 10 necklaces combining richly hued braided rope with metallic accents. Focused on process and material, the designers were inspired by the manipulation of sprue wax to cast in brass that, says Buntain, “produced results which are a mixture of ridged structural elements and organic form.” Indeed, the metals almost seem soft, juxtaposing strong, cage-like brass shapes on the necklaces with the illusion of malleability.

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The bracelets rely on similarly imperfect lines to convey a sense of playful, unfussy sophistication. The raw materials once again shine—fingerprints left during the manipulation process leave indelible reminders of the handmade care with which the molded, slightly golden-hued shapes were formed. With characteristic intention, Fort Standard juxtaposes the free-form silhouette of their jewelry pieces with impeccable attention to detail—necklace clasps, for example, were carved from a harder wax for a distinct design that’s nearly as noteworthy as the focal accents on the necklaces.

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Along with the necklaces and bangles, the duo has released a set of sharp brass bottle openers whose weight plays perfectly with smooth edges and geometric lines. The entire collection is now available to purchase by contacting Fort Standard directly. Visit the website for more details.

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Shortlisted: Nick Ross’s Bioharvester Entry for the James Dyson Award

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In an idealistic version of ID, you’d never set out to design “a pair of headphones;” you’d aim to design “a way people can hear their music, hands-free, while performing a variety of activities.” In other words you’d start with the problem and design the solution with no predetermined form factor. In the real world, of course, chances are slim you’ll have this luxury when your firm is contracted by a company in the business of making headphones.

Design competitions, on the other hand, hew more to that ideal state of ID. The danger there is that absent hardnosed clients and budget constraints, rigor goes out the window and the fanciful predominates.

But industrial designer Nick Ross’ entry in the James Dyson Award, the Axolotl Selective Bio-Harvester, hits that sweet spot: It attacks the problem of deforestation based on rigorous research, not just preconceptions, and the proposed solution is meant to solve that problem the way an industrial designer would solve it.

What I mean by that last part is this: A protestor tries to solve deforestation by chaining themself to a tree. An environmentalist activist might organize rallies. A town council might ban logging and force companies to go log some other town’s forest. A materials scientist might try to develop a viable alternative to wood. But what Ross did was design something that comes out of a factory and does the existing job in an entirely different way, one that changes the impact of the job itself. “Instead of directing this project in a ‘save the rainforest’ protest, I opted for a realizable and commercially viable solution,” Ross explains. “I felt this would increase the possibilities that my research and concept could become a viable solution that would benefit the forestry industry as well as the forest.”

First, the research part. Ross, who hails from New Zealand, spent roughly four months in Sweden immersing himself in the practical issues of deforestation:

I collaborated with 9 Swedish forestry companies. I organized various seminars during the project in which I invited company representatives, machinery operators and forest owners. A variety of research methodology was implemented, including on site ethnography of machine operators, multiple interviews with environmental and forestry specialists and field visits to witness current damage and effects. Throughout the entirety of the project my findings and conclusions were validated by the various people involved. The entire process was documented and compiled into a thorough report that was made available following presenting the research and final concept to a well received audience made up of representatives from all regions of the industry.

Secondly, the proposed solution Ross developed, much better explained in video:

(more…)

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theo jansen’s animarae adulari strandbeest has a pivoting neck

the creatures – made from a scaffolding of recycled bottles and plastic tubing – have now evolved to have pivoting necks, propelled only by wind.

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3D printed strvct shoes by continuum fashion

the triangulated structure of the footwear appears to be delicate and fragile, however they are strong and lightweight, featuring a 3D printed lattice surface and lined with a patent leather inner sole.

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