construction and design manual: architectural and program diagrams I

illustrating many techniques for diagrams used by ten different architectural firms, the book shows us the importance of infography in communicating ideas visually.

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Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

Recent RISD graduate Erica Sellers came up with a unique project to pursue her senior year that explored soundwaves. Sellers created a way to represent soundwaves in three-dimensional form in this chair and table and the results are most impressive.

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

Beginning with a song (“Symphonia IX” by Grimes*) and using music software, Sellers took the curves and oscillations that were originally in two-dimensional form and converted them into three-dimensional form using the modeling software Rhino 5.0. The digital 3D surfaces were then converted into files for a CNC machine to do its thing. The machine milled large wood panels that became the surfaces for the tabletop and chair.

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers

The name of the song is laser cut into the surface.

Furniture Inspired by Soundwaves by Erica Sellers
Process shot in wax

Kind of unrelated, but check out Grimes’ amazing video performance on KEXP of “Symphonia IX”.


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Caroline in Home Furnishings, Technology | Permalink | 3 comments

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Popshot Magazine

The illustrated poetry magazine adds fiction to the mix in the October issue

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For a glimpse at the changing face of poetry, cast aside the dusty anthology and make room for the 21st century’s answer to an ancient art form—Popshot Magazine. Created in 2008, the British-based print magazine is now the flag-bearer for a new generation of creative writers and illustrators.

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The London-based outlet calls upon poets to write original, thought-provoking pieces of work based on a set theme. Inundated with thousands of submissions for each issue, the Popshot team performs the arduous task of picking just a handful of poems for publication. Those selected are then sent to a group of 20 illustrators who create an image to match the text. Jacob Denno, the mastermind behind Popshot, calls this process a “conversation” between the two art forms, stating that “poems give reason for the illustrations to exist and vice versa.” This allows readers to engage with ideas that may have otherwise gone unexplored and creates a beautiful balance of text and image—all crammed into 64 pages of uncoated 115 gsm, which gives the magazine an organic and earthy feel.

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The next issue of the biannual publication, “Birth,” is set to drop in October, and will mark a rebrand for the magazine after seven issues. In addition to a new logo, website and composition, Popshot will also be taking short story and flash fiction submissions to accompany the poetry that has come to define the magazine.

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“There’s one poem in particular that blows my mind every time I read it and a few short stories that are frankly bizarre,” says Denno of the upcoming edition. “One of them tells the story of a man who falls down a hole and spends the rest of his life falling. He meets his wife, they have children, set up home, and live life in a permanent state of free-fall. I won’t tell you how it ends although you might be able to guess.”

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In going to such great lengths to drag poetry and prose into the modern age, Popshot is handing the art of writing back to the masses in the form of a stunning publication. Popshot Magazine can be found through a select number of international stockists and online, with two-year subscriptions running £19 in the UK, £26 in the rest of Europe and £32 elsewhere worldwide.

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Above the Cloud – Archaeology of Social Networks

Created by Boris Meister at ECALAbove the Cloud is an atlas about social networks archeology, death and digital marks left in distress on the internet. Boris attempts to present the complex subject and, above all, explain it by creating an object – book, both in its structure, images and layout

Continue reading…. Above the Cloud – Archaeology of Social Networks

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