Heri, Hodie, Cras

Graffiti styling, religious symbolism and Afro-Brazilian influences from Stephan Doitschinoff

Heri, Hodie, Cras

The son of an Evangelical minister, Stephan Doitschinoff is a Brazilian artist with a penchant for religious iconography and bright graphic styling. His scope includes installation and video, though Doitschinoff is perhaps best known for his paintings and public works. Opening tonight, “Herie, Hodie, Cras” (Latin for “Yesterday, Today,…

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Wanna Make Your Own iPhone 5 Case? CAD and STL Files Available

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This morning we passed the mob scene at the Apple Store SoHo, where hundreds are already queued up to buy the iPhone 5. Chances are none of them yet have a MakerBot Replicator 2, but for those of you with other 3D printers who plan on making your own case for the 5, the blueprints are now available online.

To download the large version of the 2D CAD file you see above, click here.

MakerBot user Hisashikun can get you a step further, as he’s already taken the time to input the dimensions into an STL file and uploaded it to Thingiverse. Print out your own iPhone 5 dummy, which you could then use, for example, as a plug to make a leather case around.

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Flotspotting: “Ocean’s Edge” Table by Tyson Atwell

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Earlier this year, we saw Tyson Atwell‘s work in Milan, as one of the nine RISD Furniture Design students in “Transformations” at Ventura Lambrate. At a total of 75 lbs—the steel skeleton surrounded by 190 teacup-sized flower pots—the “Terra Lamp” might not be a particularly practical lighting fixture, but that wasn’t the point: the designer elegantly responded to the brief to reimagine the banal.

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Upon earning his MFA in May, Atwell set up shop in Los Angeles, which might explain why his latest work reflects a laid back, distinctly West Coast vibe. Constrained only by technology, the “Ocean’s Edge” table is a striking combination of form and materials: the undulating center of the tapered sugar maple tabletop contrasts nicely with the hard lines of the black maple legs.

The ‘Ocean’s Edge’ dining table is part of an ongoing body of work utilizing a CNC router to digitally sculpt oceanic waveforms moving across planar wood surfaces. The undulating surface that rises out of and dips into the center of the table was developed in CAD by ‘lofting’ a sequence of tide curves sourced from the entrance of the San Francisco Bay.

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As with Brooke Davis’s “Tablescape No. 1,” the “Ocean’s Edge” table is an uncannily organic application of the digitally-enhanced fabrication process.

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Piramida

Sampled sounds from an Arctic ghost town comprise the unlikely music on Efterklang’s new album

Piramida

Perpetually in search of new possibilities in the realm of music, the trio behind the Danish band Efterklang set out on a sound-seeking mission last August to the remote island of Spitsbergen to create their fourth album, Piramida. Over the course of their nine-day expedition on the Arctic isle—one…

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London Design Festival 2012: Neil Conley Elevates Steampunk with the “Submariner” Lamp

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Following his work as a Designer in Residence at Northumbria University, it seems that Neil Conley can do no wrong: we loved his beautiful, thought-provoking glassware and his recent award-worthy medals. The Newcaste-upon-Tyne-based industrial designer is pleased to unveil the “Submariner,” a dimmable table lamp, at DesignJunction 2012.

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The barrel-like exterior of the lamp consists of two pieces of bead-rolled steel—available in galvanized, enamel gloss or textured matte—neatly fastened with a pair of worm-driven clamps. “The process of bead rolling introduces rigidity to the lightweight sheet structure; providing a return to house the diffusers whilst creating exterior channels for the clamps.” The diffusion plates are available in “a selection of heavy tints, allowing the bulb to be at maximum luminosity without creating glare, with light escaping through the aperture at the rear.”

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London Design Festival 2012: Designjunction

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With few exceptions the products on exhibition at Designjunction have already made the rounds in New York and Milan. Some, like the Designers in Residence ICFF award-winning exhibition, “Tools for Everyday Life,” are worth a quick revisit. A group of designers working and studying in the open-ended residency at Northumbia University created a range of products in response to a brief to explore traditional craft manufacturing of helpful objects for, as the exhibition title notes, everyday living. [Editor's Note: They presented several of these projects as well as several new ones at this year's ICFF.]

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The Amazing LIFX Smart Lightbulb

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The latest runaway Kickstarter success is the LIFX, “a WiFi enabled, multi-color, energy efficient LED light bulb that you control with your [smartphone]. Developed by San-Francisco-based inventor Phil Bosua and his support team, the LIFX is an iPod-like invention in that it combines several existing technologies into a novel and useful device that seems easy to use; apparently it’s plug-and-play (though the demo video admittedly doesn’t show how the initial set-up interface is handled).

I’m not sure how often I’d use the color-change feature, though bar owners are sure to love it. The nightlight/timer feature shown in the video looks pretty cool though, and I wonder if you can use it in reverse, slowly ramping your lights up in the mornings to wake you up.

If you think the LIFX looks amazing, you’re not alone: The project easily smashed its $100,000 goal and is now up to $994,729 with 56 days left to pledge. At $69 a pop the bulbs aren’t cheap, but they’re meant to last for 25 years, and discounts are conferred for buying in bulk.

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