Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Talk about a two-for-one. This combination table and lamp is brilliant – it’s super sleek and simple but with the utmost functionality. Illusion, designed by Hareide Design for Northern Lighting, is a wall-mounted lamp (or hanging lamp, see below) that is literally cut in half, making quite a statement. It’s the perfect place to set your keys or mail without taking up tons of space.

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

If the wall-mounted Illusion lamp isn’t for you, they also make a hanging version. How cool would this be hanging next to a chair or sofa to sit your cocktail on or even hanging just as a pendant fixture. Definitely a conversation piece!

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

Illusion Lamp for Northern Lighting

All photos by Tom Gustavsen, except for the last photo which is by Damian Heinisch and Simen Skyer, all of Norway.


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Caroline in Home Furnishings | Permalink | 1 comment

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national stationery show: seed house


I feel like this post should be titled, “Shauna and Stephen never sleep”. The incredibly talented duo behind Something’s Hiding in Here and Forage Bowties have done it again, launching yet another fantastic design project called Seed House. Seed House launched at this year’s NSS and included a beautiful selection of cards, tags, paper scents and, my favorite, press botanical stationery with a flower press. I don’t know how they find the time to DO all of this, but they do it well. Seed House is definitely an instant favorite of mine. The light in that section of the show was hard to shoot in, so you can check out more of their work here. xo, grace



More images from Seed House after the jump…

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Student Work – Thorbjørn Gudnason

Designed by Thorbjørn Gudnason | Country: Denmark

“Motozone is a fictitious company that is specializes in high-end auto parts. A company which strays away from discount products and appeals to serious car enthusiasts. The Motozone logo works a bit differently as the word after “Moto” changes depending on the product. Motopart – Is the private label of Motozone – a wide range of quality products, made to ensure the customers long lasting use. This showcased material is the wrench tool line, which changes size depending on the size of the wrench.”

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florian schmid: stitching concrete – chair + bench

each piece is formed by folding the concrete canvas medium which is impregnated with cement when drenched in water. after cutting
and seaming, it is then sewn together to achieve the correct shape and volume.

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Best of Holon Design Week: Corkers by Reddish

Best of HDW takes a closer look at some of the most exciting projects featured in Design Museum Holon’s “Designers Plus Ten” exhibition.

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If I had to guess, Naama Steinbock and Idan Friedman of Reddish studio probably got the most global press this past year of anyone in the exhibition. Chances are you’ve probably seen Corkers, a series of kits that turn wine corks into ‘party animals.’ The steel and plastic attachments are sold in a box that’s meant to hang around the neck of a wine bottle. Can you say cutest hostess gift ever? And at $8 apiece you can buy the whole set: Monkey, Deer, Buffalo, Bear, Bunny and Crow. Or mix and match the body parts to create your own species.

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Corkers are only the latest design from Reddish, which strives to “help objects feel better about themselves.” Naama and Idan also showed Bath & Beyond, a chair made from cutting and bending an old steel bathtub. I love their Menorah, which finds a use for mismatched candlesticks. Equally clever is Hanukit, a small aluminum stand for matchsticks—perfect for those who like to keep their holiday accessories to a bare minimum. There a couple of oddities in their portfolio, like China?, a 3-D printed vase that mimics painstakingly hand-carved China, as well as Buttercup, a “spontaneous picnic dress.”

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Metaproject 02

Josh Owen and the Corning Museum of Glass challenge RIT students to explore the creative limits of glass

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While knowledge is commonly attributed to experience, fresh ideas often come from fresh minds. Taking this perspective to heart, veteran designer and educator Josh Owen developed Metaproject, an experimental industrial design course at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Now in its second year, the course is partnered with the Corning Museum of Glass (CMoG) to challenge students to think in new ways about glass as a creative material. As Metaproject 02 came to a close, the course recently culminated with a showing of select works during this year’s NYC Design Week.

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“Glass is already playing a vital role in the future of industrial design as many ‘futuristic’ technologies are moving quickly towards mass-production,” said Owen who also noted that besides innovations in architecture and mobile devices he’s interested in the more immediate and rudimentary potential that glass holds. The course offeres a rare chance for his students to hunker down and design for two full terms, giving a glimpse into the professional world by seeing their designs grow iteratively from ideation to production. And by exploring with cast glass and recycled glass, many students showed a shared interest in designing for the future with a more immediate application in mind.

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August Kawski’s “The Receiver” tackles the issue of social disconnectivity by way of technology. Kawski sees the heavyweight cast glass object as creating “a physical, visual and auditory barrier—a return to personal communication by freeing oneself from the responsibilities and burdens of the cell phone.” By referencing the iconic Dreyfus phone as the object’s handle Owen feels it “cements the object’s semiotics, making a completely new typology strangely familiar and therefore more intuitive.” Also one to challenge the idea of objects as mood altering devices, Dan Ipp also went a similar route with the “Illuminated Side Table.” Here the glass tubes diffuse the light to create an ambient mood that welcomes the user to relax.

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For more information on the ever evolving Metaproject check the comprehensive RIT site—and keep an eye on Owen as well. To learn more about what the Corning Museum of Glass is up to in the near future swing by NYC’s Governers Island this summer to visit the GlassLab, CMoG’s glass design workshop and performance center.

Images by Elizabeth Lamark

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