The Evil Eye – Optical audio record by Indianen

The Evil Eye project is the result of a residency by Belgium collective Indianen at the Frans Masereel Center, a center for printmaking in Kasterlee. The project investigates how printmaking could produce another kind of information, transforming material into an object with a new meaning.�

Continue reading…. The Evil Eye – Optical audio record by Indianen

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Rock Garden by Kazuhiro Yamanaka for Pallucco

Rock Garden by Kazuhiro Yamanaka for Pallucco

Inspired by Japanese rock gardens, Kazuhiro Yamanaka designed the Rock Garden ceiling lamp for Pallucco. In the gardens, a large portion of the rock is hidden below the ground while part of it remains in view, like an iceberg. Each rock has its own story and beauty about it, and when placed together, they form a relationship.

Rock Garden by Kazuhiro Yamanaka for Pallucco

The lamp is made up of a single pyramidal shape, and in the larger version, multiple pyramid shapes, which are similar to a garden. With the larger version, you can place the shapes in your own configuration in the rectangular frame.

Rock Garden by Kazuhiro Yamanaka for Pallucco

Rock Garden by Kazuhiro Yamanaka for Pallucco

Rock Garden by Kazuhiro Yamanaka for Pallucco

Rock Garden by Kazuhiro Yamanaka for Pallucco

Rock Garden by Kazuhiro Yamanaka for Pallucco

Rock Garden will be on the market in September 2012.


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Caroline in Home Furnishings | Permalink | No comments

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Barn Redevelopment by Ruinelli Associati Architetti

The barn redevelopment project addresses the issue of the transformation of a disused farm, situated on the route leading out from the historical village centre, into a living space. The new architecture is related to the existing through a dialogue of tradition and contemporary, with the attention to a correct contextualization. The architecture is sober and proposes itself as a new project and, at the same time, as something that fits in with the existing village. The house is on three levels, the entrance is on the ground floor, with services areas and guest rooms overlooking the courtyard. The first floor is a unified space with kitchen, living room and study arranged around the block of the stairs and fireplace. Another room and a “loggia” are located on the second floor.

The facades are made of stone and wood, as the original texture, and have smooth concrete inserts, with a core of reinforced concrete, framing the new openings of the ground floor. The stone corner walls and roof are existed. The large openings are filtered by vertical oak axes, making up a manually moveable screen. The outdoor areas are arranged on three levels, as the natural slope, designed through a smooth concrete wall, that enunciating the theory of contemporary construction in continuity with the context.

Inside, the materials used are contemporary but not-compound and not-industrial. They are: smooth concrete, raw solid oak wood and hand- treated welded steel. The material has a rough appearance, but it is prepared and used not with improvisation and approximation, but instead with extreme accuracy, design and craftmanship. The smooth concrete has a static behaviour similar to that of a traditional brick wall. (There was not the possibility of using reinforced concrete inside because of the conditions of the construction site -the roof was maintained-). The new wall tries to merge with the old stone wall, as if it was its translation in the language of contemporary techniques. Everything is prepared before laying the concrete, switches, doors and window frames…

The implementation is experimental and derives from research through 1:1 scale models. All the oak used (25 cubic meters) was acquired and processed in the same place, so that material would have the same colour, behaviour and the same “patina”. The material used is a key element of this architecture. In this house the atmosphere is achieved through the care and culture of the craft, and materializes in line with the roughness of the place, and it is expressed in the designing of the details, in a homage to craftmanship, to know-how.

Barn Renovation, Soglio, Switzerland, by Designer, for Ruinelli Associati Architetti

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Fresh From The Dairy: Water, Framed

I thought in this week’s The Design Milk Dairy, we’d round up some of our favorite water-themed prints that look especially good when framed. Sometimes a good frame can make all the difference.

Fresh From The Dairy: Water, Framed

WAKE by Phil Jones

Don’t you just love this one? Here are some more:

Fresh From The Dairy: Water, Framed

It’s in the Water by Bianca Green

Fresh From The Dairy: Water, Framed

Salt Water Cure by Tina Crespo

Fresh From The Dairy: Water, Framed

Bangburd Bay by Ian Carpenter

In an ongoing effort to support independent artists from around the world, Design Milk is proud to partner with Society6 to offer The Design Milk Dairy, a special collection of Society6 artists’ work curated by Design Milk and our readers. Proceeds from the The Design Milk Dairy help us bring Design Milk to you every day.


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Jaime in Art | Permalink | No comments

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Chaplin Lamp by Martin Hirth

Chaplin Lamp by Martin Hirth

Inspired by Charlie Chaplin’s trademark hat and walking stick, Martin Hirth created the Chaplin Lamp. Made of a simple wooden stand and metal lampshade, the fixture’s “hat” is easily adjustable allowing it to sit at different angles. There are slots that hold the shade in position based on your preference. Also, the light comes from a neon tube, which creates no shadows. I love the nod to Chaplin without it being over the top.

Chaplin Lamp by Martin Hirth

Chaplin Lamp by Martin Hirth

Chaplin Lamp by Martin Hirth

Chaplin Lamp by Martin Hirth

Chaplin Lamp by Martin Hirth

Chaplin Lamp by Martin Hirth


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Caroline in Home Furnishings | Permalink | No comments

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Geometric Jewelry: Fathom and Form

Really digging the geometric shapes and sharp angles of San Francisco-based jewelry studio Fathom and Form. For boys and girls and everything in between, we like the hints of tribal patterns and the sort of futuristic feel to their pieces. New pieces debuted this year in May, and we expect lots more cool designs from them in the future. See more of their work on the Fathom and Form website.

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The OMG CNC

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If this large-scale CNC machine had been built in America we’d be using it to carve swimming pools and skateparks, because that’s how we roll. But the higher-ups at Germany’s EEW Protec mechanical engineering firm are using it for more sensible things, like carving one-piece molds for 50-meter turbine blades.

The machine has an X-axis of 151 meters which, despite the metric, sounds more like an American dimension to me. Because that’s what we do over here. A neighboring firm makes one first with an X-axis of 150 meters, then we add an extra meter and casually bring it up during the inter-company softball game. “No no, that’s great, Bob,” we’d say. “I’m sure 150 meters is big enough for the projects you guys work on. But ours maxes out at, you know, 151 or 152.”

You may notice that there’s a guy standing in the mold. He’s probably German, so I can’t tell you what he’s doing in there. If he was American, I could tell you that without a doubt, he’s a bored engineer patiently playing a dangerous game of CNC chicken. Because that’s how we…ah, you get the idea.

(more…)

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