Burritobot: The Tortilla-Filling 3D Printer

Burritobot: The Tortilla Filling 3D Printer

We all know that 3D printers have taken over the design world but how about the food world? Well Burritobot might just do that. It’s a 3D printer that prepares burritos that you can actually eat. Say, what?! What originally began as a master’s thesis project for Marko Manriquez has now turned into a full-on 3D printer prototype that I desperately need in my home.

Burritobot: The Tortilla Filling 3D Printer

Burritobot fills tortillas with the perfect amount of burrito ingredients from salsa to guac.

Burritobot: The Tortilla Filling 3D Printer

Burritobot: The Tortilla Filling 3D Printer

I’m pretty sure this thing could bring peace to the world if everyone had one. Am I right? Burritos for everyone!

Burritobot: The Tortilla Filling 3D Printer

Burritobot: The Tortilla Filling 3D Printer

Burritobot: The Tortilla Filling 3D Printer

Burritobot: The Tortilla Filling 3D Printer

From what we hear, Burritobot will be up on Kickstarter soon… we can’t wait!

[via msnbc.com]


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Caroline in Technology | Permalink | 1 comment

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Energy-Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

The thesis project of Swedish student Eddi Törnberg heads in a direction that should be noted. Unplugged is an office that facilitates producing the energy needed to run all of our office electronics through doing everyday activities.

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

Based on the quote “Human nature is above all things lazy” by Harriet Beecher Stowe, Törnberg’s thesis came from the belief that society as a whole lacks “the will, interest and energy to struggle to achieve a sustainable society.” So instead, Törnberg created a way around it by deriving energy from things we already do and, since we spend so much of our time working, it’s kind of brilliant.

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

In Unplugged, there are three techniques used to produce energy: piezoelectricity from the carpet, the chair utilizing the Seebeck effect, and the flower through photosynthesis.

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

Energy Producing Workspace by Eddi Törnberg

How do you feel about this idea? And also, do you believe we as a society lack “the will, interest and energy to struggle to achieve a sustainable society”?


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© 2012 Design Milk | Posted by Caroline in Home Furnishings, Technology | Permalink | 1 comment

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Swedish Barn-like House for Sale

You bet it’s another home for sale in Sweden somewhere with sleek modern interiors that will make you furious that you probably can’t afford it. Though to be fair this one is only around 200k which isn’t really that bad considering how awesome this space is. Are you looking at those interior wood walls?

The outside seems to have a shou-sugi-ban finish, which we adore. Eco-friendly and dramatic.

What a small but powerful image! And set in such lovely natural surroundings.

Do you have $210,000 or so dollars? Then this place could be yours. From Fantastic Frank.

What do you think about the inside and outside of this wonderful home for sale? Would you buy it?!

Images: Fantastic Frank

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Art Basel: Animals

Creatures on canvas, cast in metals, suspended in air and more at Switzerland’s massive show

Whether the main subject of a taxidermy-inspired sculpture or an allegorical reference within a larger composition, animals are an evergreen source of inspiration among a diverse range of media and genres. The pivotal role creatures play was apparent in fresh, provocative ways at this year’s Art Basel, where we encountered several works that shed new light on a classic subject. See the works that got our goat below.

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The “Nice Bird of Prey Shoe” (1975) was constructed by Austrian artist and avant-garde feminist Birgit Jurgenssen. The surrealist escape offered by Juergenssen’s work aims to appease the tension wrought by the socio-cultural turmoil of the 20th century. Constructed of metal, feathers, and chicken claws, the unsettling accessory is from Galerie Hubert Winter in Vienna.

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The Swiss arts foundation Not Vital, which promotes preservation and exchange between cultures, presents “Peking Duck” (2009-2011), a glossy update of the Chinatown staple in 18k gold. The sculpture is on view at NYC’s Sperone Westwater Gallery.

“Kuriere” (2012) by German artist Dirk Lange combines pencil, colored pencil, and ink to create an abstract portrait of a war general and his pigeon. Sweet pastels juxtapose the subject’s obliterated face for a conceptual riff on the stately pose. The piece is available at Berlin’s Galerie Michael Haas.

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Both a hunter and an artist, Marc Swanson has established a body of work around a breathtaking set of bedazzled crystal deer-antler sculptures. According to the gallery, Swanson’s five-piece “Untitled (Crystal Hooking Left)” (2011) edition stems largely from his personal history, started as a way to “explore, both physical and spiritually, the duality of masculine identities he was experiencing.” The piece was constructed from polyurethane foam and crystal, and is from Richard Gray Gallery.

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“Snow White and The Seven Dwarfs (or The Witches)” (1985) by Swiss artist Jean Tinguely fuses together a hodgepodge of metals into eight motorized sculptures. From wrought iron bits and scrap to bicycle frames and axles, the seemingly creaky contraptions are laced together with strips of fabric and animal skulls for a slightly macabre vibe. The piece, made in the late years of Tinguely’s life, is from Galerie Hans Mayer in Düsseldorf, Germany.

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Known for his irreverent sculptures, Athens-based artist Dionisis Kavallieratos turns to oil on canvas in the detailed work “A Ballad for Chicken Banana” (2010). In monochromatic gray tones he manages to cast a subject that’s at once mighty and absurd. The piece was on view at Athens’ Breeder Gallery.

“Pollinator” (2011) by E.V. Day casts the reproductive organs of flowers—specifically those from Claude Monet’s famous lily pond in Giverny—into a demonstration of the animal-like ability to reproduce through pollination. Day sifted through a pile of clipped flowers (those that are weeping in the garden are cut by the gardeners) and then pressed and scanned and ultimately processed the best of each type of flower into three-dimensional form. The sculpture is made of a resin core, with polished nickel-plated copper and is from Carolina Nitsch in New York.

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Spotted at the W Hotels Designers of the Future exhibit, the aptly titled “Go-Round” by Tom Foulsham comprises a balance of a miniature giraffe kissing a miniature whale on a single sharpened point. Rather than being propelled mechanically, it is moved by everyday objects like hair dryers, fans, balloon dresses, or by simply blowing.

A tabletop is transformed into an illusion of a deep-sea abyss with “Octopus (Krake)” (2012) by Swiss-born, Munich-based artist David Bielander. The limited-edition cast-bronze candelabra is available at the Ornamentum Gallery in Hudson, New York.

Images by Josh Rubin

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DIY Cloud Mobile

Before you don’t click on this because you think it’s a kid thing or something, consider who really needs the cheering up in your household. Don’t most kids seem to be bursting with the joy of life like, 24/7? It’s usually us grumpy grown-ups plodding through each day just trying to crack a smile. Well with this DIY project you won’t need to try, you’ll just naturally smile when you see it. Plump, plush, and customizable with your own choice of fabric or hanging element, you could make several of these cuties — and change them out depending on your mood or the mood you’d like. More on Petit Poulou and warning: the site is in French.

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Jason Middlebrook’s Version of Nature

It’s hard to improve upon nature itself. Full of wonders that even some human eyes have never touched, no one can doubt its extraordinary beauty. But, if there were an artist coming close to improving on nature — or at the very least creating a lovely alternative — it might be Jason Middlebrook. His simple graphic, geometric patterned paintings on stunning wood planks are like a meditation between art and nature. Truly stupendous work that we’d be honored to hang on a wall or lean in a corner. Can you imagine how lovely this would be in a modern home? More on Jason Middlebrook’s website.

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Words of a Middle Man – Human to machine and machine to machine dialogues

“Words of a Middle Man” is a project by Christoph Steinlehner, Lino Teuteberg and Jeremias Volker at the Univerity of Applied Sciences in Potsdam. The project includes a wireless router which analyses the communication on its own network and reinterprets it on a computer display into a “natural” language

Continue reading…. Words of a Middle Man – Human to machine and machine to machine dialogues

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Design: Paper

Analog creativity shows an old medium in a new form

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Edited by Austin-based creative collective Public School, “Design: Paper” gathers together some of the medium’s more curious recent works, spanning the areas of identity, print, packaging, stationery and papercraft. The book explores the upside of the digital age’s encroachment on paper: tangible projects may be less frequently explored now, but because of this they are now more thoughtfully designed.

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“Once used as a platform to hold a message, paper is now being used as the message,” writes Public School designer Cody Haltom in the book’s introduction. Filled with around 300 examples, the image-heavy book illustrates how several young practices are pioneering a relevant paper revolution, and how they envision its place in the future.

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This isn’t just a wave of nostalgia, these designers are hoping to create works that are as forward-thinking as they are long-lasting. Essays from FÖDA Creative Director Jett Butler, Kelli Anderson, RoAndCo founder Roanne Adams, Owen Gildersleeve and Because Studio‘s Loz Ives offer a sincere look at their penchant for the medium and how it relates to their design processes. For example, Adams, who regularly uses paper in her graphic design work, relays a few tips on mastering the art of selecting the best paper stock for the printing technique, while Gildersleeve, a talented papercraft artist, talks about the patience paper projects require, and finding beauty in the imperfections the analog format creates.

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Alongside an extensive range of works culled from around the world, the book also takes a “Closer Look” at the distinct design process behind studios like Manuel, The Metric System, Bond Creative Agency, Foreign Policy and Chevychase, to name a few. The array of ways in which paper can effectively, and often very subtly, shape an alluring message are fascinating—from a simple business card to elaborate packaging.

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“Design: Paper” sells online from Amazon and Rockport Publishers for $40.

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