ALIGN: A Limited Edition Rug by Joe Doucet & Odabashian

ALIGN: A Limited Edition Rug by Joe Doucet & Odabashian

New York-based artist and designer, Joe Doucet, collaborated with Odabashian, one of the oldest handmade rug companies in the Americas, to create the limited edition ALIGN. The Tibetan-knotted rug was created just for the recently held WantedDesign 2013 and was on display there.

ALIGN: A Limited Edition Rug by Joe Doucet & Odabashian in home furnishings Category

Most knotted rugs of this caliber are made around 2mm x 2mm grids and Doucet used this to work off of when he came up with his geometric design. The rug is woven in India and the design measures 5′ x 8′ and contains over one million, Tibetan single knots. Only 10 are available at this size but other sizes can be made custom.

ALIGN: A Limited Edition Rug by Joe Doucet & Odabashian in home furnishings Category

ALIGN: A Limited Edition Rug by Joe Doucet & Odabashian in home furnishings Category

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digital grotesque: a 3D printed room by michael hansmeyer

80 million surfaces generated using modeling software and mesh-based digital language have resulted in a series of 3D printed complex architectural objects that will soon culminate in a full scale room.

The post digital grotesque: a 3D printed room by michael hansmeyer appeared first on designboom.

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light wing trainers: tyvek paper shoes that weigh 150 grams

weighing just under 150 grams, the training shoes take advantage of the structural material properties of flashspun high-density polyethylene fibers.

The post light wing trainers: tyvek paper shoes that weigh 150 grams appeared first on designboom.

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Monograph: Shiro Kuramata by Deyan Sudjic

Shiro Kuramata (1934-91) was a truly exceptional designer of furniture and interiors. Many of his poetic, precise and unique pieces, like the expanded-metal-mesh How High the Moon Armchair and the acrylic, aluminium and paper-flower Miss Blanche Chair, are still highly prized, collected by museums like MoMA and the V&A and sold at auction. Sadly, however, most of the hundreds of interiors he designed no longer exist, and can only be glimpsed in photographs or described by those who saw them.

This combination of the precious and the disappeared is appropriate for a designer like Kuramata, whose work was neither modern nor nostalgic, neither western nor Asian, but which has a remarkable creative power as well as a sense of endless invention. This compelling and highly influential work is documented here in this beautiful monograph.

Author Deyan Sudjic, the director of the design museum in London and the author of many highly-acclaimed books on design and architecture, tells the story of Kuramata’s life against the backdrop of Japan’s turbulent history from the 1930s to the 1990s. It was a period in which the collapse of the repressive conformism of Japan’s traditionally authoritarian social order released a creative explosion that propelled Japan into the creative forefront in cinema, literature, fashion, architecture and design, and Kuramata’s work occupies a special place in this period.

Designed by Jonathan Hares, and presented in two volumes with a beautiful acrylic slipcase, the book includes all of Kuramata’s work, depicted in never-before-published photographs and drawings from the Kuramata archives. Many projects are represented with images of the design and manufacturing process, appropriate for this very technically inventive work that continues to be of interest to a wide range of designers. Shiro Kuramata is a major figure who richly deserves the wider audience he is just beginning to attract, and this first-ever monograph will be of a quality and beauty to match the work he produced.

Shiro Kuramata, by Deyan Sudjic, 2 volume hardback ediiton in acrylic slipcase, 305 x 238 mm (9 3/8 x 12 in), 416 pp, 600 colour illustrations, ISBN: 9780714845005, Published by Phaidon

Buy it here: Amazon

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Inside Facebook’s Data Center Near the Arctic Circle

020 Inside Facebook’s Data Center Near the Arctic Circle

On the edge of the Arctic Circle, where the River Lule meets the Gulf of Bothnia, lies a very important building. Facebook’s newest data center – in Luleå, Sweden – is now handling live traffic from around the world. Facebook claims Luleå is likely to be one of the most efficient and sustainable data centers in the world. All the equipment inside is powered by locally generated hydro-electric energy. It is 100% renewable and they have been able to reduce the number of backup generators required at the site by more than 70%.

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Via Design You Trust – Design Blog and Community http://designyoutrust.com/2013/06/inside-facebooks-data-cent…

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Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P

Chilean architecture and design studio gt2P (Great Things to People) has launched a new collection of lighting called Vilu, which happens to be their first collaboration with DHPH. Made using a combination of digital fabrication and traditional techniques, like assembling the pieces by hand, the organic forms let light peek out through the delicate perforations that are in place to bend the metal.

Watch the video:

The curved edges of the light help guide light down to define a space. The lighted area encapsulates whomever is underneath it to become “embedded in the inner spatiality.”

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The collection is inspired by an old Chilean myth about the archipelago of Chiloé, where two forces battled and one raised the level of the water while the other raised the level of the land. They continued the fight until they were both satisfied with the shape of the archipelago.

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Inspired by Myth: Vilu Light Collection by gt2P in home furnishings Category

Photos by Aryeh Kornfeld.

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Don’t Forget The Important Things with “Here”

Don’t Forget The Important Things with “Here”

Here is a fun new product from Russian design company Maximovich Design founded by two young designers named Anna and Maxim Maximov.

The object, designed in three different versions and colors, was made to make sure you don’t forget the important things… you know, like your wallet, keys and cellphone. It literally points to the important things, which you place in the circular area, designating them as important.

You can get all three—one for each person in your family to place their important items.

Dont Forget The Important Things with Here in home furnishings Category

Dont Forget The Important Things with Here in home furnishings Category

Dont Forget The Important Things with Here in home furnishings Category

I would totally use one as a banana stand. Bananas are important!

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The Open University Presents ‘Design in a Nutshell,’ from Gothic Revival to Postmodernism

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Last week, we learned (or relearned) Dieter Rams’ Ten Principles of Good Design through a nicely-executed animation by Design Silesia. Today, we have a series of animated shorts from the Open University, a UK-based distance-learning institution. I can’t speak to the university’s academics, but it happens to be one of the world’s largest universities and is accredited in the States. In keeping with the nontraditional structure—students typically study remotely, whether they are in the UK or elsewhere—they’ve also taken to producing short educational videos on YouTube, and the latest series of shorts happens to be about “Design in a Nutshell.”

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The Bauhaus segment is a gem—I learned that Gropius’s seminal school of thought marked the genesis of the “art school as an alternative way of life,” as well as a few fun facts about Marcel Breuer. Good stuff.

(more…)

    

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